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Tuesday
Aug102010

Peanut Butter & Jelly Bread

Today we are baking bread. 

Hey! Wait!  Don't run away!  This isn't that scary bread baking - we promise.  This is that fun bread baking.  Yeah you heard us.  FUN.

You totally don't trust us.  We're hurt.  We're sad.  We love you.  We wouldn't lead you into the bread baking lion's den.  Trust.

And put away the bread maker.

This is no-knead, easy-peasy, delicious, chewy, crunchy, doughy bread.  And you made it!  Yes you did!  Yay you!

Oh and you put peanut butter and jelly in it too.  Yes you did.  Yay you! 

Because sometimes that whole assembling the peanut butter and jelly sandwich routine is just too dang hard.  It's ok.  We know.  Sometimes we just eat the peanut butter out of the jar with a really large spoon.  Um, you weren't supposed to know that.

But back to the bread.  There is a very smart man named Jim Lahey who apprently loves carbs as much as we do, but hates that scary bread baking thing.  He likes the easy bread baking thing.  We heart Jim.

And he makes you feel really good about yourself because you follow his recipes and then you get this bread that actually tastes like bread.  Like really, really, REALLY insanely good bread.

And he puts peanut butter in bread.  And jelly!  And chocolate! Wait that's for another bread baking lesson...although someone might have slathered this PB&J loaf with some Nutella.

Crap you weren't supposed to know that either.

Peanut Butter and Jelly Bread
Adapted from Jim Lahey's My Bread
Makes 1 8 inch loaf

Print Recipe

1 large egg, beaten
2 cups plus 2 tablespoons (280 grams) bread flour
2 tablespoons (20 grams) whole wheat flour
3/4 teaspoon (4 grams) table salt
1/4 teaspoon (1 gram) instant or other active dry yeast
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (260 grams) cool (55 to 65 degrees F) water
3 tablespoons (50 grams) unsalted smooth peanut butter
1/4 cup (35 grams) unsalted dry-roasted peanuts, whole
1/4 cup (35 grams) unsalted dry-roasted peanuts, roughly chopped
1/3 cup (100 grams) seedless fruit jam of choice
Nonstick cooking spray
Additional flour for dusting

1 8 x 4.5 inch loaf pan

Set aside 1 tablespoon of the beaten egg for glazing the bread.

In a medium bowl, stir together the flours, salt, yeast, and the remaining egg. In a blender, mix water and peanut butter until smooth. Add peanut butter mixture to the flour mixture and mix (a spoon or your hand works the best) until you have a wet, sticky dough - about 30 seconds. Stir in the whole peanuts.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature until the surface is dotted with bubbles and the dough is more than doubled in size, 12-18 hours (we let ours rise for about 16 hours).

When the first rise is complete, sprinkle the surface of the dough with flour. Use a rubber spatula to scrape the dough out of the bowl in one piece and onto a lightly floured surface.  Flour your hands and gently pat and pull the dough into a rough rectangle about 8 by 12 inches.

Spread the jam evenly over the surface of the dough, leaving a 1-inch border on all sides. Lifting a short end, fold one third of it over to the middle of the rectangle, then continue rolling up the remainder into a cylinder. Tuck the ends of the dough under the bottom so the jelly doesn't ooze out during baking.

Lightly coat the loaf pan with cooking spray. Sprinkle half of the chopped peanuts into the bottom of the pan. Transfer the dough, seam side down, to the loaf pan and sprinkle the remaining chopped peanuts on top. Cover the dough with a kitchen towel and let it rise for an hour in a warm spot.  When the dough has doubled in size it's ready.  If it doesn't hold an impression when you poke it with your finger, let it rise for another 15 minutes.

15 minutes before the end of the second rise, preheat the oven to 450°F, with a rack in the center.

When rise is complete, brush the top of the dough with the reserved beaten egg. Bake until golden, about 1 hour.  If the peanuts start to brown too quickly, you can cover the loaf loosely with foil.  As soon as the bread is complete, invert the pan onto a rack, remove the pan, and turn the bread right side up to cool thoroughly.

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Reader Comments (10)

I love PB & J...this looks awesome! Have you had a lot of luck with other recipes in that book? I've been curious about it for some time!

August 10, 2010 | Unregistered Commenternewlywed

Yes! We love this book! Between the 2 of us we've made walnut bread, chocolate bread, olive bread and countless pizza crusts and all have turned out fabulous. His method is really wonderful! Highly encourage you to try!

August 10, 2010 | Registered CommenterBlue Eyed Bakers

Girlfriends, this is CRAZY! So crazy I may just have to give it a go. And it's brilliant. I mean, I may never have to make my kid a PB&J again!

August 10, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterShauna from Piece of Cake

Not only your bread is perfeclty cooked but it also looks delicious!!!! I'm not that used to peanut butter + jam but I definetely have to try, it seems so good!

August 11, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterLaetitia

yum.
definitely going to try this!!

p.s. your blog is so cute :o)

I love Jim Laheys recipes!! this one sounds like it is wonderful, and I do love easy!!
thanks for sharing!

August 13, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterChef Dennis

WOW! This looks and sounds...AMAZING! Well done, girls!

PB & J is not as popular in Australia as it is in US. I hve only recently discovered the virtues of this combination and absolutely love it! This bread is making me swoon! I must give it a go soon.

ps. i really like your blog too!

August 15, 2010 | Unregistered CommenterAmy @ cookbookmaniac

PB&J is my all time FAVORITE! i cant't wait to try this!!

May 26, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterRose

Is it safe to put the egg in the dough since it has to sit out for so long? Can't the egg develop bacteria after 12 hours of fermenting?

January 5, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterLindsay

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